Comment

Foraging w/ The Great Pascal Baudar

Here some photos of my foraging trip with Pascal Baudar. (so much fun so much information) 

Pascal  is a wild food, outdoor/self-reliance instructor and author in Los Angeles, California. He has dedicated the past 12 years to studying self-reliance, traditional food preservation methods and wild food in the Southern California region and integrating them into a sustainable lifestyle.

Originally from Belgium, Pascal grew up in the rural farmland nearTournai where a close relationship with the land, knowledge of botany/agriculture and a hands-on approach to sourcing food was a natural way of life.

Specializing in wild food preservation and country Belgian/French cuisine, Pascal brings old world techniques and traditions to his culinary creations – including fermenting, salting, pickling, drying and various methods of canning, to name a few. He is also a certified Master Food Preserver / Food Safety Advisor.

His experience and artistic approach to sourcing, preparing and preserving food you find in the wilderness has allowed him to create truly unique gourmet dishes.

He has been teaching classes for the last 7 years in the Los Angeles area and has been featured in numerous publications and TV shows such as ABC News, NBC, Times magazine, Los Angeles Times, the "Wilderness Way" magazine, Pasadena Weekly and much more.

His philosophy is simple: "I consider myself a student first and continue learning every day from the world around me, people attending my classes and the wonderful people I seek expertise from whenever I don't have the answer."

Pascal is also an avid competitive marksman, outdoor photographer, as well as an accomplished, award winning artist and creative director.

For more information about Pascal check out his website:  www.urbanoutdoorskills.com

Comment

Comment

Egg cookery demo

I had a great time filming several egg cookery demos with www.saltedtv.com this week. Tutorials should be up soon!

The only way to make sure you are getting the highest quality eggs is to look for "pastured" and "organic". Because now the word organic is being regulated by the USDA and they are allowing factory farmer to keep 15 thousand chickens in a coup.  Eggs from hens raised on pasture may contain: • 1⁄3 less cholesterol • 1⁄4 less saturated fat • 2⁄3 more vitamin A • 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids • 3 times more vitamin E • 7 times more beta carotene Cage free and free range are misleading. They used to keep hens in a small container about the size of a sheet of paper. Now all they do is keep 50k hens in one large Wearhouse stacked on top of each other and they can't move or go outside.  According to Michigan State University Extension, egg color is determined by the genetics of the hens. The breed of the hen will indicate what color eggs she will produce. For example, Leghorn chickens lay white eggs while Orpington's lay brown eggs and Ameraucana produce blue eggs. Grass-fed/pastured hens are raised on pasture, as opposed to being kept in confinement and fed primarily grains.  Pastured hens' diets are naturally complemented with bugs, earthworms, and other such critters that give their eggs a huge nutritious oomph. Although not necessarilly organic, pastured hens are usually much healthier and happier than their space-restricted and antibiotic-pumped industrial cousins.  Pasturing is the traditional method of raising egg-laying hens and other poultry. It is ecologically sustainable, humane, and produces the tastiest, most nutritious eggs.   

The only way to make sure you are getting the highest quality eggs is to look for "pastured" and "organic". Because now the word organic is being regulated by the USDA and they are allowing factory farmer to keep 15 thousand chickens in a coup. 

Eggs from hens raised on pasture may contain:

• 1⁄3 less cholesterol

• 1⁄4 less saturated fat

• 2⁄3 more vitamin A

• 2 times more omega-3 fatty acids

• 3 times more vitamin E

• 7 times more beta carotene

Cage free and free range are misleading. They used to keep hens in a small container about the size of a sheet of paper. Now all they do is keep 50k hens in one large Wearhouse stacked on top of each other and they can't move or go outside. 

According to Michigan State University Extension, egg color is determined by the genetics of the hens. The breed of the hen will indicate what color eggs she will produce. For example, Leghorn chickens lay white eggs while Orpington's lay brown eggs and Ameraucana produce blue eggs.

Grass-fed/pastured hens are raised on pasture, as opposed to being kept in confinement and fed primarily grains. 
Pastured hens' diets are naturally complemented with bugs, earthworms, and other such critters that give their eggs a huge nutritious oomph. Although not necessarilly organic, pastured hens are usually much healthier and happier than their space-restricted and antibiotic-pumped industrial cousins. 

Pasturing is the traditional method of raising egg-laying hens and other poultry. It is ecologically sustainable, humane, and produces the tastiest, most nutritious eggs. 

 

Comment